TRACKING MOVING CARGO: USING SMART TECHNOLOGY AND DATA ANALYTICS FOR TRUCKING SECURITY

Global supply chains are totally reliant on goods being transported onboard trucks for part or all of their journey. So, not surprisingly, trucks are the mode of transport most targeted by cargo thieves. In the EMEA region, TAPA’s Incident Information Service (IIS) data shows that some 95% of all recorded crimes involve losses from trucks, while a report last year by Sensiguard revealed a 56% year-on-year rise in cargo thefts, especially during peak season when thefts of products such as electronics, food and beverages, and apparel are notably prevalent.

The dramatic rise in eCommerce shipments onboard trucks due to lockdown measures to prevent the further spread of the coronavirus, means these statistics are likely to continue rising. Fortunately, supply chains now have access to a broad range of security systems and technologies to prevent such incidents from occurring. 

This was the topic of one of TAPA APAC’s latest podcasts as Roger Lee, Board Member of TAPA Asia Pacific, invited Verghese Thirumala, Managing Director of electronic security systems company Maxitulin, to discuss the latest smart technologies for tracking cargo on the move and the use of data analytics to improve trucking security.

Smart trucking technologies for tracking and security

The podcast discussed five technologies designed to protect trucks: 

  • Trailer ID Sensor: Trailers frequently go missing when parked. The ID sensor helps to track the locations of detached trailers, which not only supports the recovery of stolen trailers but also tracking in ports and huge transport yards.
  • Door Sensor: This is built into the door to identify when cabin or trailer doors are opened. The command center can remotely control these doors, including when to open door(s) at the right time and location.
  • Temperature and Humidity Sensor: This is important for perishables or products that require strict temperature controls, such as food and pharmaceuticals. Any indication of a change of temperature and humidity may mean a theft attempt and can be quickly acted upon.
  • Indirect Cost Saving Sensors: Such as tyre sensor & load sensors. 
  • Safety Sensors: Including tilt and motion sensors, proximity and alcohol sensors.

CCTV & Video Surveillance

Over 90% of CCTV installation is basic CCTV with no video analytics, Verghese Thirumala stated. These systems are ‘forensic’ in nature and can capture an intrusion or act of crime by someone watching the security monitor or be used as part of the investigation process into a crime. However, it is practically impossible for anyone to monitor passive CCTV for more than five-to-ten minutes, he adds, which explains why most CCTV recordings are only retrieved after a crime has occurred. 

The current trend is in ‘preventive’ solutions where video analytics identifies a security breach like intrusion, trespassing, loitering, tag and track, tampering etc. The video surveillance system will prompt a notification onscreen to capture the security officer’s attention of a potential security breach in action.

The future of video surveillance, however, is ‘predictive’ analysis. This is where Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Big Data analytics play a crucial part. With video analytics capabilities embedded in CCTV technology, CCTV monitoring is used to highlight risk areas and potential crime precursor actions e.g., loitering, facial detection/recognition, facial expression etc. As the 'brains' of a security system, it can significantly improve levels of security, using metadata to sense, detect and structure the video captured. This technology is starting to be used across various industries. For example, airports monitor the facial expressions of passengers to narrow down potential crime risks.

In the supply chain industry, video surveillance can be installed at entry and exit gates to monitor trucks, including LPR (License Plate Recognition) and for checking both sides and the tops and bottoms of trucks. To identify drivers and support staff, facial detection technology is also used for verification. In addition, the Container Recognition System captures container identification data and links it to a tracking number within system records.

Visitor Management System & Vehicle Recognition

It is important that supply chain firms track all visitors, staff and drivers operating their trucks, as well as the loading and unloading of goods, and people and vehicles entering or exiting their premises. Visitor Management Systems help to track all visitors entering and exiting premises in real time and capture data across multiple gates and locations. Including:

 

  • Access to authorized zones to help monitor visitors trespassing is out-of-bounds areas;
  • Name of Host or Department: A host should be able to upload visitor details such as the expected number of guests and vehicles;
  • Purpose of visit;
  • Duration of visit, enabling the system to highlight visits that are longer than expected to indicate potential risk;
  • Temperatures of visitors to support Covid SOPs, for example
  • Blacklisted visitors: A pop-up screen in the system to caution security staff.

Truck management software captures the company’s trucking fleet and driver information for tracking, assignment, and analytics using LPR technology and an automated queue system. This  records all basic information such as number plate and driver details, and information including the type of truck, color, and times the vehicle enters and exits the premises. At any time, a logistics company can know the number of trucks on its premises, how many have loaded and left, how many have loaded but are still onsite, how many are waiting for unloading and so on.

 

Remote Monitoring & Technological Advancement with 5G

People are continuously learning about the importance of technologies, especially relating to remote access and monitoring. This is particularly important given the challenges of the current Covid-related travel restrictions, for example.

Telecommunications companies play a critical part in data and video transmission. Moving to 5G will be an exciting step for all businesses by providing faster and better communication, Verghese says, while the evolution of IoT (Internet of Things) means companies can be leaner.

Nonetheless, he adds, it is important to note that even with all these technological advancements, having the right skills in place to manage systems will remain vitally important. 

To listen to the full podcast episode, please click the link below.

https://www.tapa-apac.org/podcast-6-tracking-cargo-on-the-move-smart-technology-data-analytics-for-trucking-security/

The dramatic rise in eCommerce shipments onboard trucks due to lockdown measures to prevent the further spread of the coronavirus, means these statistics are likely to continue rising. Fortunately, supply chains now have access to a broad range of security systems and technologies to prevent such incidents from occurring. 

This was the topic of one of TAPA APAC’s latest podcasts as Roger Lee, Board Member of TAPA Asia Pacific, invited Verghese Thirumala, Managing Director of electronic security systems company Maxitulin, to discuss the latest smart technologies for tracking cargo on the move and the use of data analytics to improve trucking security.

Smart trucking technologies for tracking and security

The podcast discussed five technologies designed to protect trucks: 

  • Trailer ID Sensor: Trailers frequently go missing when parked. The ID sensor helps to track the locations of detached trailers, which not only supports the recovery of stolen trailers but also tracking in ports and huge transport yards.
  • Door Sensor: This is built into the door to identify when cabin or trailer doors are opened. The command center can remotely control these doors, including when to open door(s) at the right time and location.
  • Temperature and Humidity Sensor: This is important for perishables or products that require strict temperature controls, such as food and pharmaceuticals. Any indication of a change of temperature and humidity may mean a theft attempt and can be quickly acted upon.
  • Indirect Cost Saving Sensors: Such as tyre sensor & load sensors. 
  • Safety Sensors: Including tilt and motion sensors, proximity and alcohol sensors. 

CCTV & Video Surveillance

Over 90% of CCTV installation is basic CCTV with no video analytics, Verghese Thirumala stated. These systems are ‘forensic’ in nature and can capture an intrusion or act of crime by someone watching the security monitor or be used as part of the investigation process into a crime. However, it is practically impossible for anyone to monitor passive CCTV for more than five-to-ten minutes, he adds, which explains why most CCTV recordings are only retrieved after a crime has occurred. 

The current trend is in ‘preventive’ solutions where video analytics identifies a security breach like intrusion, trespassing, loitering, tag and track, tampering etc. The video surveillance system will prompt a notification onscreen to capture the security officer’s attention of a potential security breach in action.

The future of video surveillance, however, is ‘predictive’ analysis. This is where Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Big Data analytics play a crucial part. With video analytics capabilities embedded in CCTV technology, CCTV monitoring is used to highlight risk areas and potential crime precursor actions e.g., loitering, facial detection/recognition, facial expression etc. As the 'brains' of a security system, it can significantly improve levels of security, using metadata to sense, detect and structure the video captured. This technology is starting to be used across various industries. For example, airports monitor the facial expressions of passengers to narrow down potential crime risks.

In the supply chain industry, video surveillance can be installed at entry and exit gates to monitor trucks, including LPR (License Plate Recognition) and for checking both sides and the tops and bottoms of trucks. To identify drivers and support staff, facial detection technology is also used for verification. In addition, the Container Recognition System captures container identification data and links it to a tracking number within system records.

Visitor Management System & Vehicle Recognition

It is important that supply chain firms track all visitors, staff and drivers operating their trucks, as well as the loading and unloading of goods, and people and vehicles entering or exiting their premises. Visitor Management Systems help to track all visitors entering and exiting premises in real time and capture data across multiple gates and locations. Including:

  • Access to authorized zones to help monitor visitors trespassing is out-of-bounds areas;
  • Name of Host or Department: A host should be able to upload visitor details such as the expected number of guests and vehicles;
  • Purpose of visit;
  • Duration of visit, enabling the system to highlight visits that are longer than expected to indicate potential risk;
  • Temperatures of visitors to support Covid SOPs, for example
  • Blacklisted visitors: A pop-up screen in the system to caution security staff.

Truck management software captures the company’s trucking fleet and driver information for tracking, assignment, and analytics using LPR technology and an automated queue system. This  records all basic information such as number plate and driver details, and information including the type of truck, color, and times the vehicle enters and exits the premises. At any time, a logistics company can know the number of trucks on its premises, how many have loaded and left, how many have loaded but are still onsite, how many are waiting for unloading and so on.

Remote Monitoring & Technological Advancement with 5G

People are continuously learning about the importance of technologies, especially relating to remote access and monitoring. This is particularly important given the challenges of the current Covid-related travel restrictions, for example.

Telecommunications companies play a critical part in data and video transmission. Moving to 5G will be an exciting step for all businesses by providing faster and better communication, Verghese says, while the evolution of IoT (Internet of Things) means companies can be leaner.

Nonetheless, he adds, it is important to note that even with all these technological advancements, having the right skills in place to manage systems will remain vitally important. 

To listen to the full podcast episode, please click the link below.

https://www.tapa-apac.org/podcast-6-tracking-cargo-on-the-move-smart-technology-data-analytics-for-trucking-security/